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Annual Conference 2014

14 - 17 April 2014
  1. Overview
  2. Programme
  3. Abstracts
  4. Registration
  5. Accommodation
  6. Venue and directions
  7. General info
  8. Exhibitors
Annual Conference 2014

Overview

The Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2014 will be held from the 14 to 17 April at the Arena and Convention Centre, Liverpool, UK.

The Society’s Annual Conference attracts over 1,000 attendees from the UK and further afield and is Europe’s largest annual gathering of microbiologists. Whether you are a veteran microbiologist or just starting out in your career, attending the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference is a must for all of those with an interest in microbiology.

If you have any questions please email conferences@sgm.ac.uk.

Programme

  1. Monday
  2. Tuesday
  3. Wednesday
  4. Thursday
Monday 14 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • LI01 10 Questions in virology

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    10 Questions in virology

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI02 Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI03 Cell cycle

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Cell cycle

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI04 Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
17:35
  • LI01 10 Questions in virology

    12:00 - 17:35

    Close
    10 Questions in virology

    Time: 12:00 - 17:35    Add to outlook

    Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI02 Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    12:00 - 17:30

    Close
    Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI03 Cell cycle

    12:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Cell cycle

    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI04 Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    12:00 - 17:30

    Close
    Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI05 Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    13:50 - 17:30

    Close
    Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    Time: 13:50 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Tuesday 15 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • CVN UK Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    UK Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This symposium will involve issues relevant to the UK Clinical Virology Network (www.clinicalvirology.org). In particular with concentrate on emerging infections/issues or new guidelines.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI01 10 Questions in virology

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    10 Questions in virology

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI02 Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI03 Cell cycle

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Cell cycle

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI04 Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI05 Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    9:00 - 11:55

    Close
    Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    Time: 9:00 - 11:55    Add to outlook

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
17:30
  • CVN UK Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    12:00 - 17:30

    Close
    UK Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    This symposium will involve issues relevant to the UK Clinical Virology Network (www.clinicalvirology.org). In particular with concentrate on emerging infections/issues or new guidelines.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI01 10 Questions in virology

    12:00 - 16:30

    Close
    10 Questions in virology

    Time: 12:00 - 16:30    Add to outlook

    Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI02 Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    12:00 - 17:30

    Close
    Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI03 Cell cycle

    12:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Cell cycle

    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI04 Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    12:00 - 14:00

    Close
    Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    Time: 12:00 - 14:00    Add to outlook

    Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI05 Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    13:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    Time: 13:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Wednesday 16 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
Afternoon
12:00
17:30
Thursday 17 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • LI07 Viruses in the respiratory tract

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Viruses in the respiratory tract

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Viruses that transmit via the respiratory route are among the most common acute infections in man and other mammals. It is estimated that every human will experience 2-3 colds per year; that adds up to us spending 2-3 years of our lives with a cold. Ranging from the common cold to Spanish influenza that claimed more than 40 million lives in the pandemic of 1918, respiratory viral infections claim headlines: recent research into influenza transmission resulted in a moratorium; and the new MERS coronavirus carries a high case fatality rate in the handful of people infected so far, worryingly reminiscent of the SARS outbreak of 2003. This symposium will take a closer look at the respiratory tract as a site for viral replication, look into how viruses pass through the air and ask why respiratory viruses cause such a wide range of disease outcomes.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI08 Evolution of microbial populations within the host

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Evolution of microbial populations within the host

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The evolution of microbial populations during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during bacterial infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. Traditionally, single clinical isolates have been taken to be representative of infecting populations of bacteria but recent studies employing deep sequencing techniques have revealed considerable diversity among bacterial populations derived from single or closely-related infecting strains. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification and adaptation during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. In this symposium, investigators at the forefront of this burgeoning new field will present the latest research and lead discussion on its importance and potential applications.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI09 RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

    9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Our understanding of bacterial regulation has been transformed in recent years by the discovery of non-protein based mechanisms. It has become apparent that RNA plays a significant role in controlling bacterial processes. This session will look at the recent progress that has been made in understanding some of these RNA-based regulatory mechanisms, the new paradigms that are emerging, and the development of technologies to facilitate their study.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
15:00
  • LI07 Viruses in the respiratory tract

    12:00 - 15:00

    Close
    Viruses in the respiratory tract

    Time: 12:00 - 15:00    Add to outlook

    Viruses that transmit via the respiratory route are among the most common acute infections in man and other mammals. It is estimated that every human will experience 2-3 colds per year; that adds up to us spending 2-3 years of our lives with a cold. Ranging from the common cold to Spanish influenza that claimed more than 40 million lives in the pandemic of 1918, respiratory viral infections claim headlines: recent research into influenza transmission resulted in a moratorium; and the new MERS coronavirus carries a high case fatality rate in the handful of people infected so far, worryingly reminiscent of the SARS outbreak of 2003. This symposium will take a closer look at the respiratory tract as a site for viral replication, look into how viruses pass through the air and ask why respiratory viruses cause such a wide range of disease outcomes.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI08 Evolution of microbial populations within the host

    12:00 - 15:00

    Close
    Evolution of microbial populations within the host

    Time: 12:00 - 15:00    Add to outlook

    The evolution of microbial populations during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during bacterial infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. Traditionally, single clinical isolates have been taken to be representative of infecting populations of bacteria but recent studies employing deep sequencing techniques have revealed considerable diversity among bacterial populations derived from single or closely-related infecting strains. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification and adaptation during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. In this symposium, investigators at the forefront of this burgeoning new field will present the latest research and lead discussion on its importance and potential applications.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • LI09 RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

    12:00 - 15:00

    Close
    RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

    Time: 12:00 - 15:00    Add to outlook

    Our understanding of bacterial regulation has been transformed in recent years by the discovery of non-protein based mechanisms. It has become apparent that RNA plays a significant role in controlling bacterial processes. This session will look at the recent progress that has been made in understanding some of these RNA-based regulatory mechanisms, the new paradigms that are emerging, and the development of technologies to facilitate their study.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook

Other events

Back to programme overview

Conference Session

  1. CVN UK Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Organiser Kevin Brown

    This symposium will involve issues relevant to the UK Clinical Virology Network (www.clinicalvirology.org). In particular with concentrate on emerging infections/issues or new guidelines.

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Matthew Donati (University Hospital Bristol, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Vaccines against enteric viruses
      Timo Vesikaru (University of Tampere Medical School, Finland)

    4. 09:45

      Anti-virals against Hepatitis C
      Graham Foster (The Blizard Institute, UK)

    5. 10:30
    6. 11:00
    7. Chair William Tong (St Barts Hospital, UK)

    8. 11:40
    9. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    10. 12:30
    11. 13:00
    12. Chair Peter Coyle (Belfast Health & Social Care Trust, UK)

    13. 14:00
    14. 14:40

      Vaccines and anti-virals against Cytomegalovirus
      Mike Sharland (St George’s Hospital, UK)

    15. 15:30
    16. 16:00
    17. 16:30
    18. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    19. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    20. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  2. LI01 10 Questions in virology

    Organiser Paul Duprex (Virology Division) David Matthews

    Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

    Monday 14 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Paul Duprex (Boston University, USA) and David Evans (University of Warwick, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Where do viruses come from?
      Christian Drosten (Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Germany)

    4. 09:30
    5. 09:45
    6. 10:00

      Can we track viruses in real time, in the real world?
      Jonathan Read (University of Liverpool, UK)

    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00

      In Vivo Veritas
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, USA)

    9. 11:30
    10. 11:45
    11. 12:10

      SGM Prize Medal lecture: Climate change, oceans and infectious disease: Cholera pandemics as a model
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Rita Colwell (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies)

    12. 13:00
    13. Chair Paul Duprex (Boston University, USA) and David Evans (University of Warwick, UK)

    14. 14:00

      Are there any ‘good’ viruses?
      Michael Strand (University of Georgia, USA)

    15. 14:30
    16. 14:45
    17. 15:00
    18. 15:30

      Has the reductionist approach of reverse genetics had its day?
      Richard Elliott (University of Glasgow, UK)

    19. 16:00

      Systems virology: a new "golden age" or fishing exercise?
      Angus Lamond (University of Dundee, UK)

    20. 16:30

      Debate
      The plenary presentations will be followed by an open debate to which the audience are encouraged to contribute. Together with the speakers, Martin Ryan (St. Andrews) and Julian Hiscox (Liverpool) will join Stephen Curry to discuss the contributions of 'systems' and 'reductionist' approaches to virology. Questions from the floor are welcome or can be sent during the session or in advance to pduprex@bu.edu, or @10queues via Twitter.

    21. 17:00

      Can we make a universal influenza virus vaccine?
      Peter Palese (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA)

    22. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize lecture: Science communication: a communicable disease?
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Stephen Curry (Imperial College London, UK)

    23. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Michelle West (University of Sussex, UK) and David Matthews (University of Bristol, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Can we link the dynamic development of viruses to what we see?
      Sarah Butcher (University of Helsinki, Finland)

    4. 09:30
    5. 09:45
    6. 10:00
    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00
    9. 11:30
    10. 11:45

      Offered paper - Can you detect infection without sensing viral PAMPs?
      Jerry Tam (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK)

    11. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    12. 13:00
    13. Chair Michelle West (University of Sussex, UK) and David Matthews (University of Bristol, UK)

    14. 14:00

      Will virology ever have a 'penicillin moment'? 
      Leen Delang (KU Leuven, Belgium)

    15. 14:30

      Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?
      Rogier Sanders (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

    16. 15:00

      Offered paper - Flexible virus escapes antibody neutralization
      Christiane Wobus (University of Michigan, US)

    17. 15:15

      Can we track viruses in real time, in the real world?
      Jonathan Read (University of Liverpool, UK)

    18. 15:30
    19. 16:00
    20. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    21. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    22. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  3. LI02 Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

    Organiser Kim Hardie, Gail Preston and Kalai Mathee

    Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

    Monday 14 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Signalling

      Chair Miguel Cámara (University of Nottingham, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Quorum sensing sophistication: integrating signals new and old
      Paul Williams (University of Nottingham, UK)

    4. 09:30
    5. 10:00
    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:30
    9. 12:10

      SGM Prize Medal lecture: Climate change, oceans and infectious disease: Cholera pandemics as a model
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Rita Colwell (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies)

    10. 13:00
    11. Chair Kim Hardie (University of Nottingham, UK), Gail Preston (University of Oxford, UK) and Kalai Mathee (Florida International University, USA)

    12. 14:00

      The therapeutic challenge of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections
      Susanne Häußler (Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany)

    13. 14:30
    14. 14:45
    15. 15:00
    16. 15:15
    17. 15:30
    18. 16:00
    19. 16:15
    20. 16:30
    21. 16:45
    22. 17:00
    23. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize lecture: Science communication: a communicable disease?
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Stephen Curry (Imperial College London, UK)

    24. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Secretion

      Chair Kalai Mathee (Florida International University, USA)

    3. 09:00

      Type VI protein secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      Alain Filloux (Imperial College London, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Lipopeptide secretion from Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a
      Monica Höfte (Ghent University, Belgium)

    5. 10:00

      Early events in recycling of cell wall
      Sheriar Mobashery (University of Notre Dame, USA)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:30
    9. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. Social Interaction

      Chair Gail Preston (University of Oxford, UK)

    12. 14:00

      Cooperation and competition in bacterial communities
      Kevin Foster (University of Oxford, UK)

    13. 14:30

      Pseudomonas aeruginosa population diversification during infections
      Craig Winstanley (University of Liverpool, UK)

    14. 15:00

      Can’t we just all get along: How polymicrobial interactions shape disease
      Marvin Whiteley (University of Texas at Austin, USA)

    15. 15:30
    16. 16:00
    17. 16:30

      An experimental test of signalling theory using bacteria
      Steve Diggle (University of Nottingham, UK)

    18. 17:00
    19. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    20. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    21. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  4. LI03 Cell cycle

    Organiser Janet Quinn, Richard McCulloch and Petra Oyston

    The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

    Monday 14 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Cell cycle and growth control

      Chair Ursula Bond (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

    3. 09:00

      The bacterial cell cycle: membranes, walls and division machines
      Jeff Errington (Newcastle University, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Control of cell cycle transcription during G1 and S phases in yeast
      Rob de Bruin (University College London, UK)

    5. 10:00

      Bactofilins as polar landmarks in Myxococcus xanthus
      Martin Thanbichler (Max Planck Institute, Germany)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:30

      Bacterial cell division and morphogenesis
      Waldemar Vollmer (Newcastle University, UK)

    9. 12:10

      SGM Prize Medal lecture: Climate change, oceans and infectious disease: Cholera pandemics as a model
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Rita Colwell (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies)

    10. 13:00
    11. Cell Cycle Regulatory Pathways

      Chair Richard McCulloch (University of Glasgow, UK)

    12. 14:00
    13. 14:30
    14. 15:00
    15. 15:30
    16. 16:00
    17. 16:30
    18. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize lecture: Science communication: a communicable disease?
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Stephen Curry (Imperial College London, UK)

    19. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Regulation of DNA replication and cell cycle exit

      Chair Petra Oyston (Dstl, Porton Down, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Visualizing genome instability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe
      Susan Forsburg (The University of Southern California, USA)

    4. 09:30

      Evolution and maintenance of circular chromosomes in bacteria
      François-Xavier Barré (CNRS, France)

    5. 10:00
    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      Regulation of DNA replication - insights from comparative genomics
      Conrad Nieduszynski (University of Nottingham, UK)

    8. 11:30

      Offered paper - Life Without DNA Replication Origins
      Thorsten Allers (University of Nottingham, UK)

    9. 11:45
    10. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. Environmental Impacts on Cell Cycle Progression

      Chair Janet Quinn (Newcastle University, UK)

    13. 14:00
    14. 14:30

      Starvation responses and cell cycle control
      Sean Crosson (University of Chicago, USA)

    15. 15:00
    16. 15:15
    17. 16:00

      Redox sensing mechanisms that control cell cycle progression
      Brian Morgan (Newcastle University, UK)

    18. 16:30

      Cell cycle control in response to proteotoxic stress
      Kristina Jonas (LOEWE-Zentrum für Synthetische Mikrobiologie, Germany)

    19. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    20. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    21. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  5. LI04 Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

    Organiser John Morrisey, Ursula Bond, Elinor Thompson and Rocky Cranenburgh

    Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

    Monday 14 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Elinor Thompson (University of Greenwich, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Engineering non-conventional yeasts for industrial biotechnology
      Tom Jeffries (University of Wisconsin, USA)

    4. 09:30

      Mining algal genomes for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites
      Severin Sasso (Friedrich Schiller University, Germany) 

    5. 10:00
    6. 10:30

      Towards Biotechnology 2.0: synthetic biology of bioactive molecules
      Eriko Takano (The University of Manchester, UK)

    7. 11:00
    8. 11:15
    9. 11:30
    10. 12:10

      SGM Prize Medal lecture: Climate change, oceans and infectious disease: Cholera pandemics as a model
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Rita Colwell (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies)

    11. 13:00
    12. Chair Rocky Cranenburgh (Prokarium Ltd, UK)

    13. 14:00
    14. 14:30
    15. 15:00
    16. 15:15
    17. 15:30
    18. 16:00
    19. 16:30
    20. 17:00

      Bioengineering yeasts for generating bioethanol from biomass
      Ursula Bond (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

    21. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize lecture: Science communication: a communicable disease?
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Stephen Curry (Imperial College London, UK)

    22. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Ursula Bond (University College Dublin)

    3. 09:00

      Rewiring metabolism: from cellular networks to microbial consortia
      Travis Bayer (Imperial College London, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Modelling yeast metabolism
      Paul Dobson (The University of Sheffield, UK)

    5. 10:00
    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:15

      Lead optimization of polyketide natural products
      Barrie Wilkinson (John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK)

    9. 11:30

      Cell factories: Engineering yeast for terpene production
      Christine Lang (Organobalance, Germany)

    10. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    13. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    14. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  6. LI05 Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

    Organiser Geertje van Keulen, Gill Douce, Lucinda Hall (co-opted) and Nicola Rose

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

    Monday 14 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 12:10

      SGM Prize Medal lecture: Climate change, oceans and infectious disease: Cholera pandemics as a model
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Rita Colwell (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies)

    3. Current developments in STI diagnosis, treatment and prevention

      Chair Nicola Rose (NIBSC, UK)

    4. 13:50
    5. 14:00
    6. 14:30

      From syndromic to rational decision making in STI care- the unmet need in STI diagnostics
      Jan Clarke(The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH), UK)

    7. 15:00

      Trichomoniasis - when the villains team up
      Raina Nakova Fichorova (Harvard Medical School, USA)

    8. 15:30
    9. 16:00

      A shot in the arm towards effective HIV vaccines
      Robin Shattock (Imperial College, UK)

    10. 16:30

      HPV Immunisation in England
      David Mesher (Public Health England, UK)

    11. 17:00
    12. 17:15
    13. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize lecture: Science communication: a communicable disease?
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Stephen Curry (Imperial College London, UK)

    14. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

    Tuesday 15 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Microbial infections in the sexual and reproductive systems

      Chair Geertje van Keulen (Swansea University) and Gail Douce (University of Glasgow)

    3. 09:00

      Antimicrobial resistant gonorrhoea: a public health challenge
      Catherine Ison (Public Health England Centre for Infections, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Immune evasion and Syphilis pathogenesis
      Sheila Lukehart (University of Washington, USA)

    5. 10:00

      Mycoplasma genitalium: microbiology, clinical disease and public health implications
      David H. Martin (Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, USA)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      The genomics of Chlamydia trachomatis: a constant surprise.
      Nicholas Thomson (Sanger Institute, UK)

    8. 11:30

      Offered paper - Shigella flexneri as a sexually transmitted infection in MSMs
      Kate Baker (Wellcome Trust Institute Sanger Institute, UK)

    9. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize lecture: Understanding the basis of antibiotic resistance
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. 14:00
    12. 14:30
    13. 15:00
    14. 15:15
    15. 15:30
    16. 16:00

      Can viruses affect bovine fertility?
      Joe Brownlie (Royal Veterinary College, UK)

    17. 16:30

      Role of BoHV-4 in bovine uterine infections
      Gaetano Donofrio (University of Parma, Italy)

    18. 17:35

      The Future of Publishing
      Room 12, Arena and Conference Centre Liverpool
      Programme summary (click to download)

    19. 17:35

      How to Succeed in Science without Really Trying
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Jonathan Yewdell (National Institutes of Health)

    20. 18:15

      Poster viewing and welcome reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  7. LI06 Mind-altering microbes

    Organiser Rocky Cranenburgh

    This session brings together for the first time several fascinating examples of microbes altering the behaviour of humans and other animals, either to achieve their own ends or as a side effect of infection or ingestion. The strategies and molecules used by viral, bacterial and eukaryotic commensals and pathogens to influence their more complex hosts will be investigated.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Rocky Cranenburgh (Prokarium Ltd, UK)

    3. 09:30
    4. 10:00

      Infectious behaviour in a parasitic wasp or the story of a behaviour-manipulating DNA virus
      Julien Varaldi (University of Lyon, France/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    5. 10:30
    6. 11:00

      How do psychedelic drugs work on the brain?
      Robin Carhart-Harris (Imperial College London, UK)

    7. 11:30

      Alcohol and its role in the evolution of human society
      Ian Hornsey (Founder, Nethergate Brewery)

    8. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    9. 13:00
    10. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    11. Chair Karen Robinson (University of Nottingham, UK)

    12. 14:00

      Diabolical effects of rabies encephalitis
      Alan Jackson (University of Manitoba, Canada)

    13. 14:30

      A review of neurobrucellosis
      Philip Elzer (Louisiana State University, USA)

    14. 15:00
    15. 15:30
    16. 16:00
    17. 16:30
    18. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    19. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    20. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  8. LI07 Viruses in the respiratory tract

    Organiser Wendy Barclay

    Viruses that transmit via the respiratory route are among the most common acute infections in man and other mammals. It is estimated that every human will experience 2-3 colds per year; that adds up to us spending 2-3 years of our lives with a cold. Ranging from the common cold to Spanish influenza that claimed more than 40 million lives in the pandemic of 1918, respiratory viral infections claim headlines: recent research into influenza transmission resulted in a moratorium; and the new MERS coronavirus carries a high case fatality rate in the handful of people infected so far, worryingly reminiscent of the SARS outbreak of 2003. This symposium will take a closer look at the respiratory tract as a site for viral replication, look into how viruses pass through the air and ask why respiratory viruses cause such a wide range of disease outcomes.

    Thursday 17 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Janet Daly

    3. 09:00

      Why is RSV so prominent a cause of distal airway obstruction
      Raymond Pickles (University of North Carolina, USA)

    4. 09:30

      Understanding the symptoms of common cold and flu
      Ronald Eccles (Cardiff University, UK)

    5. 10:00

      Influenza transmission: floating in the air
      Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:30

      Mechanisms of rhinovirus induced exacerbations of airway disease
      Sebastian Johnston (Imperial College London, UK)

    9. 12:00

      Human Metapneumovirus: New Kid on the block or golden oldie?
      John Williams (Vanderbilt University, USA)

    10. 12:30
    11. 13:30

      Pathogenesis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection
      Bart Haagmans (Erasmus Medical Centre, The Netherlands)

    12. 14:00
    13. 14:30

      When is a respiratory virus not a respiratory virus?
      Paul Duprex (Boston University School of Medicine, USA)

  9. LI08 Evolution of microbial populations within the host

    Organiser Ross Fitzgerald, Nick Thompson and Johanna Jeffries

    The evolution of microbial populations during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during bacterial infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. Traditionally, single clinical isolates have been taken to be representative of infecting populations of bacteria but recent studies employing deep sequencing techniques have revealed considerable diversity among bacterial populations derived from single or closely-related infecting strains. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification and adaptation during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. In this symposium, investigators at the forefront of this burgeoning new field will present the latest research and lead discussion on its importance and potential applications.

    Thursday 17 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Ross Fitzgerald (The Roslin Institute, The University of Edinburgh, UK)

    3. 09:00

      Adaption of Mycobacterium abscessus to transmission and lung infection
      Julian Parkhill (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Evolution of antibiotic resistance in the host
      Ben Howden (University of Melbourne, Australia)

    5. 10:00

      Evolution of Pseudomonas syringae in planta
      Dawn Arnold (University of West of England, UK)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      Salmonella enteritidis: rapid evolution within an immunocompromised patient
      Robert Kingsley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK)

    8. 11:30
    9. 11:45
    10. 12:00
    11. Chair Nick Thompson (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK)

    12. 13:00

      Evolution and Pathoadaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginos in cystic fibrosis patients
      Rasmus Marvig (Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)

    13. 13:30
    14. 13:45
    15. 14:00

      Genomic evolution of Helicobacter pylori within its human host
      Xavier Didelot (Imperial College London, UK)

    16. 14:30
  10. LI09 RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

    Organiser Petra Oyston

    Our understanding of bacterial regulation has been transformed in recent years by the discovery of non-protein based mechanisms. It has become apparent that RNA plays a significant role in controlling bacterial processes. This session will look at the recent progress that has been made in understanding some of these RNA-based regulatory mechanisms, the new paradigms that are emerging, and the development of technologies to facilitate their study.

    Thursday 17 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Petra Oyston (Defence Science and Technology laboratory, Porton Down, UK)

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:30
    5. 09:45
    6. 10:00

      Dual RNA-seq: the RNA complement of pathogen and host in one go
      Jorg Vogel (Max Planck Institute, Berlin, Germany)

    7. 11:00

      Novel tuneable gene expression systems based on orthogonal
      Neil Dixon (University of Manchester, UK)

    8. 11:30

      Big questions about small RNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
      Kristine Arnvig (University College London, UK)

    9. 12:00
    10. Chair Mark Stevens (University of Edinburgh, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. 13:30
    13. 14:00
    14. 14:30
  11. LI11 Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Organiser Gill Douce, Petra Oyston

    Offered papers will be welcome in any area related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level. Papers on interactions between non-pathogenic prokaryotes or indigenous microbiota and the host will also be welcome.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 09:00

      TBC
      Gordon Dougan

    3. 09:30
    4. 09:45
    5. 10:00
    6. 10:15
    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00
    9. 11:15
    10. 11:30
    11. 11:45
    12. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    13. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    14. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    15. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    16. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  12. LI12 Environmental microbiology forum

    Organiser Julian Marchesi and Graeme Nicol

    Offered papers will be welcome in any area of microbial ecology, symbiotic and non-pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, community structures and interactions, aquatic- and geo-microbiology, extremophiles, biodegradation, bioremediation, biodiversity and prokaryote evolution.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 09:00

      Molecular microbial ecology – a penny for your thoughts
      Jim Prosser (University of Aberdeen, UK)

    3. 09:30
    4. 09:42
    5. 09:54
    6. 10:06
    7. 10:18
    8. 10:30
    9. 11:00
    10. 11:12
    11. 11:24
    12. 11:36
    13. 11:48
    14. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    15. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    16. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    17. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    18. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  13. LI13 Prokaryotic cell biology forum

    Organiser Gail Preston and Sandra Macfarlane

    This forum will consider all fundamental aspects of the physiology, biochemistry and structure of prokaryotic cells. This includes metabolism, synthesis and transport of macromolecules, membrane transport of ions and small molecules, the cell cycle, cell architecture, differentiation, sensing and cellular responses, signalling and communication, bioenergetics and the structure, function and mode of action of microbial factors. Papers on the engineering and applications of microbes will also be welcome.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    3. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    4. Chair Gail Preston (University of Oxford, UK)

    5. 14:00

      A chain mechanism for flagellum growth
      Gillian Fraser (University of Cambridge, UK)

    6. 14:30
    7. 14:42
    8. 14:54
    9. 15:06
    10. 15:18

      Offered paper - The role of polyamines in bacterial growth and biofilm formation
      Anthony Michael (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA)

    11. 15:30
    12. Chair Sandra Macfarlane (University of Dundee, UK)

    13. 16:00
    14. 16:12

      Offered paper - Phospholipid trafficking in Gram-negative bacteria
      Faye Morris (University of Birmingham, UK)

    15. 16:24
    16. 16:36

      Offered paper - The role of siderophore secretion for iron competition
      Konstanze Schiessl (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH)

    17. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    18. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    19. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  14. LI14 Prokaryotic genetics forum

    Organiser Nick Thompson and Ross Fitzgerald

    Offered papers on all aspects of the genes and genomes of prokaryotes and their mobile elements will be considered, including their sequencing, transcription, translation, regulation, chromosome dynamics, gene transfer, population genetics and evolution, taxonomy and systematics, comparative genomics, metagenomics, bioinformatics, and synthetic biology.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    3. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    4. 14:00

      TBC
      Julian Parkhill (Wellcome Trust, UK)

    5. 14:30
    6. 14:45
    7. 15:00
    8. 15:15
    9. 15:30
    10. 16:00
    11. 16:15
    12. 16:30
    13. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    14. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    15. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  15. LI15 Virology workshop: DNA viruses

    Organiser Sally Roberts, David Matthews, Michelle West, James Stewart

    This workshop covers all aspects of DNA virology.  It will be structured around the typical life-cycle of the viruses and will start with pathogenesis, to focus attendees on the diversity of the diseases caused by these viruses. The sessions will then move to virus entry, uncoating, replication, transcription, assembly/structure and egress. Human and animal pathogens will be covered and there will be the opportunity for clinicians to present studies on ongoing outbreaks or epidemiological data.  Cellular immunology studies will help to illustrate how these viruses interact and abrogate immune responses. Finally applied aspects of DNA virology such as vaccination, antiviral or gene therapeutic approaches will illustrate how these viruses are being harnessed for treatment of disease.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. Chair Sally Roberts (University of Birmingham, UK) and James Stewart (University of Liverpool, UK)

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24
    6. 09:36
    7. 09:48

      Offered paper - Growing wild-type human cytomegalovirus in vitro
      Richard Stanton (Cardiff University, UK)

    8. 10:00
    9. 10:12
    10. 10:24
    11. 11:00
    12. 11:12
    13. 11:24
    14. 11:36
    15. 11:48
    16. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    17. 13:00
    18. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    19. Chair Michelle West (University of Sussex, UK) and David Matthews (University of Bristol, UK)

    20. 14:00
    21. 14:12
    22. 14:24
    23. 14:36
    24. 14:48
    25. 15:00
    26. 15:12
    27. 15:24
    28. 16:00

      Offered paper - Crystal structure of vaccinia virus protein A49
      Sarah Neidel (University of Cambridge, UK)

    29. 16:12
    30. 16:24
    31. 16:36
    32. 16:48
    33. 17:00
    34. 17:12
    35. 17:24
    36. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    37. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    38. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  16. LI16 Virology workshop: Positive strand RNA viruses

    Organiser Adrian Fox, Nicola Stonehouse and David Evans

    The workshop will encompass all aspects of positive sense RNA virology. It will include pathogenesis, illustrating the range of diseases caused by viruses with a positive sense genome and all aspects of the lifecycle i.e. virus entry, uncoating, translation, replication, assembly and egress. The workshop will aim to cover human, animal and plant viruses and also include data of clinical relevance as well as novel vaccination and antiviral strategies. The interaction between these viruses and the host cell will also be included, especially interactions with the host immune response.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 09:00
    3. 09:12
    4. 09:24
    5. 09:36
    6. 09:48
    7. 10:00

      Offered paper - Bluetongue virus NS4 protein counteracts the host antiviral response
      Maxime Ratinier (MRC - University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, UK)

    8. 10:12
    9. 10:24
    10. 11:00
    11. 11:12
    12. 11:24
    13. 11:36
    14. 11:48

      Offered paper - Mapping of the norovirus VPg:eIF4G interaction
      Eoin Leen (Imperial College London, UK)

    15. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    16. 13:00
    17. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    18. 14:00
    19. 14:12
    20. 14:24
    21. 14:36
    22. 14:48
    23. 15:00
    24. 15:12
    25. 15:24
    26. 15:54
    27. 16:06
    28. 16:18
    29. 16:30
    30. 16:42
    31. 16:54
    32. 17:06
    33. 17:18
    34. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    35. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    36. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  17. LI17 Virology workshop: Negative strand RNA viruses

    Organiser Janet Daly, Alain Kohl, (Virology Division)

    Negative strand viruses are a large and diverse group of viruses that includes many emerging and re-emerging pathogens, but also the agents of classical diseases of humans, animals and plants. We will welcome abstracts on any aspect from structure and replication to virus-cell interactions and host responses. We encourage authors wishing to submit abstracts on negative strand viruses regarded as respiratory viruses to also consider submitting their abstract to the workshop that accompanies the special symposium 'Viruses in the Respiratory Tract'.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 09:00
    3. 09:12
    4. 09:24
    5. 09:36
    6. 09:48
    7. 10:00
    8. 10:12
    9. 11:00
    10. 11:12
    11. 11:24
    12. 11:36

      Offered paper – Elucidation of the interactome of ebola virus VP24
      Isabel Garcia Dorival (University of Liverpool, UK)

    13. 11:48
    14. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    15. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    16. 14:00
    17. 14:12
    18. 14:24
    19. 14:36
    20. 14:48
    21. 15:00

      Offered paper - Species-specific host factors for Influenza A Virus replication
      Laura Martin (Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, DE)

    22. 15:12
    23. 17:30
    24. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    25. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    26. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  18. LI18 Virology workshop: Clinical virology

    Organiser Kevin Brown and Miren Iturriza-Gomara

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 09:00
    3. 09:12
    4. 09:24
    5. 09:36
    6. 09:48
    7. 10:00
    8. 10:12

      Offered paper - Genetic Diversity of Porcine Group A Rotavirus Strains in the UK
      Rebecca Chandler-Bostock (University of Nottingham, UK)

    9. 10:24
    10. 11:00
    11. 11:12
    12. 11:24
    13. 11:36

      Offered paper - Burden of Influenza B virus infections in Scotland
      Heli Harvala (Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, UK)

    14. 11:48

      Offered paper - Replication of human influenza viruses in dog tracheas: implications for viral emergence
      Gaelle Gonzalez (University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, UK)

    15. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    16. 13:00
    17. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    18. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    19. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    20. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  19. LI19 Virology workshop: Retroviruses

    Organiser Nicola Rose and Catherine Adamson

    Abstract submission is now invited for this workshop. The aim of the session is to promote discussion of current research in any area of Retrovirology, including vaccinology. Students and post-doctoral scientists are particularly encouraged to present their data. Abstracts should be a maximum of 200 words excluding title. The presenting author’s name should be indicated and their e-mail address included. Please send abstracts to csa21@st-andrews.ac.uk or nicola.rose@nibsc.org. Please be aware that in the event of over-subscription it may be necessary to offer an alternative workshop session or a poster presentation.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 12:00
    3. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    4. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    5. 16:00
    6. 16:12
    7. 16:24

      Offered paper - Modelling the Neuropathological Consequences of HIV Vaccines that Confer Partial Protection
      Debbie Ferguson (National Institute of Biological Standards and Control, UK)

    8. 16:36
    9. 16:48
    10. 17:00
    11. 17:12

      Offered paper - Investigation of a 3-helix motif in the HIV-15'UTR
      Sarah K Mercier (University of Cambridge, UK)

    12. 17:24
    13. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    14. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    15. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

  20. LI20 Virology workshop: Respiratory viruses

    Organiser Wendy Barclay

    This workshop accompanies the virus symposium taking place on Thursday 17 April ‘Viruses in the Respiratory Tract’. Short talks on any aspect of virus infection of respiratory tract will be presented, including talks on RSV, rhinovirus and influenza.

    Wednesday 16 April 2014
    1. 00:00

      Job Shop (area for displaying new and upcoming job vacancies)
      Upper Level Lobby, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Delegates are invited to advertise current and upcoming job vacancies on the boards in the Job Shop area. If you would like further information, please contact Karen McGregor. Wednesday lunchtime (13:30-14:00) will see the Job Shop area set aside for informal networking allowing prospective employers and potential applicants to discuss these positions.

    2. 12:10

      Fleming Prize lecture: Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Nikolay Zenkin (Newcastle University, UK)

    3. 13:00

      Careers Panel
      Room 11B, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Unsure what direction to take with your career? Aimed at postgraduate students, research assistants or new postdoctoral scientists, the Careers Panel provides an opportunity to meet and engage with established microbiologists and to explore career paths and progression. In the first part of the session, three professional microbiologists will give short presentations on their careers followed by an open Q&A between delegates and the panel. The session concludes with informal networking in the Job Shop area. Careers Panel presenters and other established microbiologists will be on hand for open discussions on career and development opportunities.
      Presenters: Dr Josephine Golding, The Pirbright Institute (Session Chair); Professor Wendy Barclay, Imperial College London; Dr Helen Bright, medImmune UK Ltd; Dr Rachel Walker, Society for General Microbiology

    4. 14:00
    5. 14:12
    6. 14:24
    7. 14:36
    8. 14:48

      Offered paper - Non-canonical interplay between influenza A virus (FLUAV) and the host SUMO system
      Patricia Domingues (University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, UK)

    9. 15:00
    10. 15:12
    11. 15:24
    12. 16:00
    13. 16:12
    14. 16:24
    15. 16:36

      Offered paper - Direct Measurement of Influenza A Haemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Balance
      Donald Benton (National Institute for Medical Research, UK)

    16. 16:48
    17. 17:00
    18. 17:12
    19. 17:24
    20. 17:35

      Reservoirs of bovine TB in wildlife and livestock: an environmental perspective
      Hall 1A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      Professor Elizabeth Wellington (School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick)

    21. 17:35

      MOSAIC – Café Scientifique: An explanation of the methods and findings of a study in patients with severe influenza during the H1N1 pandemic 2009-2011.
      Hall 11A, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
      The Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) project, headed by Professor Peter Openshaw looked at the 2009 influenza pandemic, in particular in hospitalised patients. We are holding a Cafe Scientifique style event at our Annual Conference in Liverpool, inviting patients from the project to come and explain more about the project, and its outcomes. This is research where people can really get involved themselves as everyone was touched by the outbreak. This links with the virology division of the Society, who are hosting a symposium and workshop on viruses in the respiratory tract at the Liverpool conference.

    22. 18:15

      Poster viewing and drinks reception
      Hall 2, Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool

Abstracts

The Abstracts Book for the Annual Conference 2014 is available to download:

Abstracts Book

Posters
  • Size of display: Standard A0 size (portrait orientation) 841mm(w) x 1189mm(h) - your poster should not exceed these measurements.
  • Posters will be displayed on poster boards measuring 1m(w) x 2m(h), one to a side.
  • Posters can ONLY be fixed by velcro.
  • Your viewing time and details on setting up and taking down will be advised prior to the conference. Details on your poster number and location will be available in the programme booklet provided within your welcome pack on arrival.
  • You are required to be available by your poster, during the designated time, to discuss the work presented.
Oral presentations

In order to ensure your presentation runs smoothly, you are asked to comply with the following:

  • PowerPoint presentations - PC version - are brought to the conference on a USB memory stick.
  • PowerPoint presentations - Mac version - can only be accepted if you bring your own laptop and connecting cables.
  • Your presentation is given to the venue a/v support staff in the Speaker Preview Room at least 2 hours in advance of your presentation to ensure compatibility with the equipment available.

Registration

Online registration has now closed. If you wish to attend the conference and you have not yet completed your booking, please register onsite at the Arena and Convention Centre, Liverpool, UK.

The Registration Desk will be located in the Galleria of the Arena and Convention Centre, Liverpool.

The Registration Desk will be open as follows:

  • Sunday 13 April 16:00-19:00
  • Monday 14, Tuesday 15 and Wednesday 16 April 08:00-19:00
  • Thursday 17 April 08:00-14:00
What's included in your registration fee?
  • Admission to all conference sessions and the exhibition
  • Lunch Monday to Thursday
  • Tea/coffee Monday to Thursday
  • Conference programme and abstract books
  • Certificate of participation
  • Vouchers for two free drinks during the poster viewing sessions on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday

Registration categories
(All rates are per day)

Registration fees
(Available until 23:59, Friday 14 March 2014**)

Affiliate

£150

Full-Concessionary Member

£60

Full Member

£80

Honorary Member

£0

International Associate Member (Not UK and Ireland)

£150

International Associate Member

£60

International Associate Member (eligible for free membership)

£0

Postgraduate Student Member £60
Undergraduate Student Member £0

Non-Member (1)

£150

Non-Member (2)
Clinical Virology Network Members (CVN)*

£80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 *CVN members are welcome to attend the entire meeting at the rate specified

** From 00:00 on Saturday 15 March 2014 a further £10 late booking fee will be added (per day) to the advertised regsitration fees in the table.

Please note: Society for General Microbiology lapsed members, who have not paid their membership fees for 2014, will not qualify for reduced registration rates. To renew membership or join the Society please contact +44(0)20 7685 2691 or email members@sgm.ac.uk. It is not possible to renew membership or join the Society during the course of a conference booking.

To qualify for SGM member rates, membership subscriptions must be paid by Friday 7 March 2014.

Visa applications

If you need a letter of invitation for a visa application, we will be happy to supply this after we have received full payment. To find out if you need a visa to visit the UK, please visit the UK Border Agency website.

It is the policy of the Society for General Microbiology not to supply an invitation letter to any delegate without payment and we will not reply to any request from an unregistered delegate. When the delegate has paid, the Conference office will email back a confirmation/receipt letter and, upon request, a letter of invitation, which may be used to obtain the necessary visa.

Please note that all conference delegates are responsible for their own travel and visa arrangements; the Society for General Microbiology will not take any responsibility for travel or visa problems.

Registration confirmation

An email confirming your booking will be sent within one week of receiving your complete registration form.

Payment Information

All registration fees must be paid in full BEFORE arrival at the conference. Any outstanding registration fees must be paid before admittance will be granted to the conference.

Special dietary requirements

While every effort will be made to accommodate special dietary requirements, these cannot be guaranteed. Special dietary requirements must be indicated at the time of booking and sent by email to conferences@sgm.ac.uk. Those with special dietary requirements should identify themselves to a member of the catering team daily and they will be directed accordingly.

Liability and insurance

Neither the organisers, nor the Society will assume any responsibility whatsoever for damage or injury to persons or property during this event. Participants are advised to arrange their own personal travel and health insurance.

Cancellations

Refunds are not provided, however substitutions of attendees can be made at any time by contacting our conferences@sgm.ac.uk.

View our video form the 2013 Manchester Conference to find out why you should attend in 2014:

Accommodation

All accommodation can be booked online through Reservation Highway, who have secured a range of options to suit all budgets throughout Liverpool at discounted rates.

  Hotel List for the SGM Annual Conference 2014

  Reservation Highway Accommodation Booking Form

Accommodation in guesthouses is also available. For further information and booking, please contact Reservation Highway.

Phone: +44 (0)1423 525577
Email: admin@reservation-highway.co.uk

Venue and directions

The conference will be held at the ACC Liverpool:

 

Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool
Kings Dock
Liverpool Waterfront
L3 4FP

General enquiries: +44(0)151 475 8888
Email: info@accliverpool.com

The conference sessions will take place in the BT Convention Centre.

Registration, lunch, refreshments, the exhibition and poster viewing sessions will all be held in Hall 2.

Getting there

Please see the detailed map and directions on the ACC Liverpool website.

By Air

Liverpool John Lennon Airport is the nearest international airport to the ACC Liverpool. The Express Bus Service Route 500 runs between the airport and Liverpool City Centre, stopping within a five-minute walk of Liverpool ACC. For a timetable and route map please visit the Arriva Bus website. Please see the Liverpool Airport website for further details.

National Express coaches run from Manchester airport to Liverpool and takes 50 minutes. Please see the National Express website for information about coach times and fares. Please see the Manchester Airport website for further information and a journey planner.

By Rail

ACC Liverpool is a 20-minute walk from Lime Street. You can also transfer at Lime Street onto the underground Wirral Line trains to James Street station (10-minute walk) or catch the CityLink Route C4 (7am–8pm) directly to ACC Liverpool. If travelling from outside Merseyside, you can catch an underground train to James Street station from Lime Street station, inclusive of the cost of your ticket.

Information about train times and fares are available from the National Rail enquries website.

Virgin Trains

Virgin trains offer discounted group travel for groups of between three and nine passengers travelling together. This currently stand at a 20% discount off Advance Fares booked through their website - for more information visit the group page of their website.

By Bus

Most Liverpool city centre bound buses will call at either Queen Square bus station (a 15-minute walk) or Liverpool ONE Bus Station, which is only a five-minute walk to ACC Liverpool.

The CityLink Route C4 bus links Queen Square bus station, James Street rail station and Liverpool ONE bus station to ACC Liverpool. CityLink Route C4 operates every 20 minutes Monday to Saturday and every 30 minutes on Sunday, between 7am and 8pm, with a maximum fare of £1 per journey. Merseytravel prepaid tickets, National Concessionary bus passes and Arriva day tickets are all valid on this service.

For up-to-date information on all bus, train and ferry services, call Traveline Merseyside on 0871 200 22 33, open 8am to 8pm or visit the Merseytravel website.

Coach

For information about travel by coach please visit the National Express website.

Car parking

Please see the ACC Liverpool website for details on local car parks.

The ACC Liverpool is a new building and some satellite navigation devices may not instantly recognise it. This can be rectified by one of the following actions:

  • Use the postcode L3 4BX, with the following co-ordinates; LAT:53.396007 LONG:-2.99118.
  • Enter the city as 'Liverpool' and the road name as 'Queen’s Wharf'.

 

General info

Badges can be collected from the SGM Registration Desk at the ACC Liverpool during the following times:

  • Sunday 13 April - from 4pm until 7pm
  • Monday 14 April - from 8am until 7pm
  • Tuesday 15 April - from 8am until 7pm
  • Wednesday 16 April - from 8am until 7pm
  • Thursday 17 April - from 8am until 2pm
Special dietary requirements

Liverpool ACC will make every effort to cater for special dietary requirements that are requested in advance (at least two weeks before the conference). Please contact conferences@sgm.ac.uk if you have one of the following special dietary requirements:

  • Gluten/wheat intolerance/coeliac
  • Dairy/lactose intolerance
  • Nut allergy (please read important information below)
  • Alcohol-free
  • Other (please specify)

Those with special dietary requirements should identify themselves to a member of the catering team daily and they will be directed accordingly.

Virgin Trains

Virgin trains offer discounted group travel for groups of between three and nine passengers travelling together. This currently stand at a 20% discount off Advance Fares booked through their website - for more information visit the group page of their website.

Eating out

For ideas on where to dine please visit the Visit Liverpool website.

Local weather

For information on the current weather forecast for Liverpool, please visit BBC Weather website.

Activities and attractions in the Liverpool area

For further information on what to see and do in Liverpool please view the Visit Liverpool website.

Exhibitors

The SGM Annual Conference 2014 is set to welcome over 1,000 delegates to the ACC Liverpool and will provide the perfect opportunity for organisations to meet influential researchers and scientists from all areas of microbiology.

Opportunities exist to exhibit, sponsor materials and host non-competing satellite symposia. The Exhibition and Promotion Guide, including the booking form, can be downloaded below.

  Exhibitor and Promotion Guide

An up-to-date plan of the available space is also downloadable:

  Exhibitor floor plan

For further details, please contact: conferences@sgm.ac.uk.

Exhibition space (2x3 metres) £540 per day

For 3x2 metre stand space located in the main exhibition area, which will also feature:

  • Refreshments and lunch-break space throughout the conference
  • Drinks reception and poster viewing sessions on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings
Sponsored Satellite Symposium £6,000 including exhibition space

Opportunities exist to talk directly to delegates via a Satellite Symposium session. One non-competing session is available on Tuesday 15 and Wednesday 16 April from 5.35pm until 6.10pm.

Programme Book adverts – from £300

The Programme Book contains all logistical and programme information and is distributed to all delegates. Opportunities exist to advertise (full colour) within it.

Delegate pack inserts £300 per item

Delegate packs will be available to all attendees. Organisations will be able to include an insert (flyer or sample maximum size A3 folded to A4) within the delegate bags.

Display table literature £200 per item

Literature will be displayed in the exhibition area. Sponsors will be able to display A4/A5 literature to all delegates attending the conference.

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