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The Society for General Microbiology is a membership organisation for scientists who work in all areas of microbiology.

It is the largest learned microbiological society in Europe with a worldwide membership based in universities, industry, hospitals, research institutes and schools.

Membership

Join the Society for General Microbiology and become part of the largest microbiology community in Europe.

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Latest News rss

  1. New research shows that bacteria survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously thought
    New research shows that bacteria survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously thought

    17 April 2014

    Each year in the UK, bacterial infections cause around 6,000 cases of a severe eye condition known as microbial keratitis – an inflammation and ulceration of the cornea that can lead to loss of vision. The use of contact lenses has been identified as a particular risk factor for microbial keratitis. New research, presented today at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference in Liverpool, shows that a bacterial strain associated with more severe infections shows enhanced resistance to a common contact lens disinfectant solution.

  2. Professor Nikolay Zenkin awarded 2014 Fleming Prize
    Professor Nikolay Zenkin awarded 2014 Fleming Prize

    16 April 2014

    Today at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference, Professor Nikolay Zenkin will be awarded the 2014 Fleming Prize. Nikolay, Professor of Molecular Biology at Newcastle University, researches RNA polymerase and its work in gene expression. His prize lecture, Multiple personalities of RNA polymerase active centre, will be held at 12.10 in Hall 1A.

  3. New research shows how pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 binds to fresh vegetables
    New research shows how pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 binds to fresh vegetables

    16 April 2014

    Food poisoning outbreaks linked to disease-causing strains of the bacterium Escherichia coli are normally associated with tainted meat products. However, between 20-30% of these are caused by people eating contaminated vegetables, as was seen in the 2011 outbreak in Europe that caused 53 deaths. Research presented today at the Society for General Microbiology’s Annual Conference shows that the disease-causing E. coli O157:H7 interacts directly with plant cells, allowing it to anchor to the surface of a plant, where it can multiply.

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Upcoming Events rss

  1. Focused Meeting 2014: Emerging Challenges and Opportunities in Soil Microbiology

    1 - 2 Sep     University of Loughborough, UK

  2. Focused Meeting 2014: Modelling Microbial Infection

    17 - 18 Nov     London, UK